top of page

Initial Public Statement

Fair-minded and informed people will recognize that my freedom to respond publicly at this time is strictly governed by legal considerations, so for the present I can offer you just this statement by one of our legal teams:

Dr. John G. Stackhouse, Jr. is deeply concerned about the recent actions taken by Crandall University (“Crandall”) to publish the details of a private investigative report (the “Report”) on their official website.


While Dr. Stackhouse acknowledges and respects the importance of addressing any misconduct allegations thoroughly and fairly, including by way of a workplace investigation that complies with best practices, the manner in which Crandall has chosen to handle this matter is profoundly concerning to him.

Dr. Stackhouse respectfully disagrees with Crandall’s decision to publicly disseminate the details of the Report, a document concerning a sensitive internal matter, because it exceeds the bounds of appropriateness and necessity. It is also imperative to note that Dr. Stackhouse categorically disagrees with, among other things, the findings of the Report. This disagreement makes Crandall’s decision to publicly disseminate these contested findings all the more indefensible.

The university’s actions in making these disputed details public are disproportionate and seemingly aimed at turning a private matter into a public spectacle. This approach is unnecessary and damaging, impacting not just Dr. Stackhouse but the very fabric of privacy and due process within private academic institutions.


At this juncture, Dr. Stackhouse has instructed his legal counsel to explore all legal avenues to address Crandall’s conduct in this publication, as the actions taken by the university in publicizing these matters have caused significant harm to Dr. Stackhouse’s reputation and career.

Online Resources for leaders and earnest disciples

 

ThinkBetter Media provides accessibleinformed, balanced, and practical Christian insight and direction around crucial issues in contemporary culture. 

If you have only half an hour—or even just 10 minutes some weeks!— you can still think better.

Sign up or start a two-week free trial  to get access to a growing library of resources where complex subjects broken down into specific, concrete, and practical content.

bottom of page